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pawtucket tmp

Hi!

How does the pawtucket/app/tmp system work? Is it really normal to have many many thousands of directories generated every day? Our installation of Pawtucket stopped working a couple of months ago due to the enormous amount of directories and files in the tmp directory. I manually deleted all the directories (the system couldn't build the list) and it started working again. Now we empty the collectiveaccessCache directory once a day through Crontab, but sometimes Pawtucket generate so many directories int the tmp directory that a rm -r command can't delete them.

What is best practice here?

Regards

Henrik

Comments

  • We use a modular cache system that support several back-ends, includes the file system (the default), redis and memcached. The file caching system is taken from Doctrine, and while it's simple to implement it does indeed generate a ton of files. The file back-end is high on my list of things that need to be replaced.

    The best practice at this time, especially for sites that see a lot of traffic, is to use redis for caching. It's packaged for most, if not all, current Linux distributions and Mac OS, and generally just works. Once it's installed and running you just change the cache settings in setup.php and you should be good to go.

    Seth
  • There's now an experimental branch on GitHub (dev/recache) with a different caching layer, that hopefully performs better than Doctrine when used with the file system. As with Doctrine it also supports REDIS, Memcached and APC. There's still a bit more work to do, then we'll put it on a few of our real world systems and see how well it works in practice.


  • Ok!

    I'll check if our Ubuntu 16.4 (TLS) installation has redis installed and give it a go.

    /Henrik
  • FWIW, the new branch now supports sqlite as well. I'm going to test that this week and see how well it performs. In principal, sqlite should be almost as easy as the file cache to get running but without the performance issues on busy sites.
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